Simon Says Rub Your Tummy

…and say yum! This week I completed a project that was a step by step booklet on how to make Spam Musubi! Musubi is a japanese inspired snack that is popular in Hawaii. Made of spam, rice, nori, and a delicious sauce, it’s a filling snack or meal and one of my personal favourite foods.

To start this project I researched packaging of japanese snacks and food. Common themes I observed were bright colors, bubbly letters, and simple, cute illustration. From this I picked the typeface Pleasantly Plump and a color scheme of light pinks, blues and greens.

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Next, the illustrations were built using the pen tool, with thick stroke on the lines and a simple color fill. I added little faces to the objects to give them that mascot like, cutesy feel.

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I designed the outside of the booklet to look like rice grains, and the cover to be very simple and pink, like a piece of Spam. The belly band was a piece of Nori. So when it all came together it looked like a small Musubi!

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That’s it for now!

Erin

 

Simon Says Rub Your Tummy

A Little Inspirtation

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Chronicle Book’s has come up with a game called Menu Mashup. It’s colorful and beautifully designed, and it reminded me a lot of what we were doing in Vis-Com class this week. Theming a restaurant simplified to a game. Take a look at it here. 

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I never thought that I would see a fashion label named after one of the stinkiest breakfast foods I’ve ever encountered, but Natto+Franco has done it. With graphic tees and sweaters priced up to 90 euros, I don’t know how on earth a fashion designer gets to that point. But the imagery is interesting and the origins are too. Check out an article about it here. 

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When I went to Turkey I ate quite a bit of Turkish Delight. I rather like the taste of the nuts in it, and it’s pretty good all in all. It’s very sweet, a tough jelly like substance that’s dusted in powdered sugar and filled with dried fruit and nuts. The first time I heard about it was from The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by CS Lewis, where the Edmond character pretty much sells out his family to an evil ice witch for it. I don’t know it’s THAT good. Learn how to make your own here.

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This is terrifying and fascinating. Some designers reengineered a 3D printer into a tattoo gun. You can download your image into the system and then get ready to go under the needle. No doubt this would create beautiful, perfect tattoos, but god, I would be scared. Watch the video here.

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Russian illustrator Nadezhda Illarionova makes these wonderfully creepy and beautiful paintings. They evoke a sense of fairytales and something larger and darker than what’s on the surface. Take a look for yourself here.

That’s it for now!

Erin

A Little Inspirtation

A Little Inspiration

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Post-Halloween always makes me feel a bit sad. Especially this year, Halloween felt very lackluster. Being busy with work has sucked the joy out of the season. I’m pretty sure that I’ve even missed the turning of the leaves, but I’ve been trapped in my dorm so who knows. However I found this playlist by the Steve at Rookie Magazine that has helped me cling onto the spooky season, perfect for playing while working on classwork or cooking. Listen to it here. 

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Who knew that Andy Warhol used to be a children’s book illustrator? Who knew that he lived in an apartment filled with cats all named Sam (and one Hester)? Who knew that his mom was an artist as well? All these facts come together in the illustrations of a book written and illustrated by Warhol and his mother: 25 Cats Named Sam and One Blue Pussy. Look at it here. 

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Butternut squash has to be one of my favourite foods in the entire world. It’s sweet, it can be savory. You can bake it, you can stew it, you can make it into pasta. Here’s a delicious looking recipe for squash with vinegar onions on top of toast, in a simple bruschetta type dish. Can’t wait to try it, maybe I’ll make it for Thanksgiving. Learn how to make it here.

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Combining both beautiful design and video games, the book Everyday is Play brings the world of video game art and design in a single text. From pixel art to concept sketches, this book lays out the ideas from games past and present. Take a look at some samples from it here.

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One last thing in the vain of Halloween, even though it’s becoming quite passé. Here is an article featuring some designer’s work on mimicking classic horror movie posters. I wish I had found this article earlier…for typography is this last week we had to design a “Spirit Week” Halloween poster for my school’s holiday festivities. It was a contest, with about 20 posters competing. We were only allowed to use glyphs we could find in a typeface. Of course, this allowed for finding cool wingdings online, but I shied away from using one of those directly. Andddd, mine won first place! I won a really nice poster tube that expands to almost my height, which is a fact that makes me very giddy. Take a look at the article here. And my poster below!

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That’s it for now!

Erin

A Little Inspiration

Port-A-Poop: the Process, the Journey

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The Task:

In 1975, Gary Dahl figured out how to sell people rocks. Not rare rocks or gems or particularly attractive rocks, but regular, smooth rocks. How did he do it? He marketed the rocks like a live animal, calling the rocks “pet-rocks”. They came in little cardboard carriers filled with “straw” and included an instruction manual on the care and keeping of your rock. By marketing this practically useless object in a fun way, he sold batches of these rocks at almost no cost to himself.

So our task was to sell an empty, sealed tin can, but create a concept and design a label that would make it a realistic product that could be put on shelves for people to buy and use.

Brainstorming:

So how do you make someone buy an empty tin can? Thinking of a good idea is easy, thinking of a great one takes a bit more brainstorming. We had to define an audience for the product. At first a lot of the ideas leaned toward the realm of gag-gift, something you’d find on shelves at Spencer’s Gifts or at the book section of Urban Outfitters. But to make the idea good enough that the can could be bought up-ironically was the next step.

My idea? A canned bathroom, complete with the tag-line “gotta use the can!” Essentially a place to “go on the go.” It seemed like the perfect gag gift, reminiscent of emergency waste releases on middle school field trips into Pepsi bottles or plastic bags (disgusting).

But I started thinking about it a little more. How about campers and survivalists? This can could be a portable, disposable item to “place your waste.”

And thus, the Port-A- Poop was born.

Designing:

In the initial design phase I decided that the product could be sold seriously under the pretense as making it an on the run toilet for those who liked to camp. Just like a cat will bury its waste to prevent attention from potential predators, people could dispose of the cans similarly. This would prevent bears and other large animals from sniffing it out.

I researched popular camping websites and the vintage look of camping supplies from the 50s and 60s. I was inspired by the typography of old National Parks branding and the imagery of classic campsite signage. I found some similar looking typefaces for my display font, as well as a nice script typeface for my captioning. I decided on the colors forest green and orange for the cans. This reminded me of not only camping, but hunting, and also of vintage cookware that would be used when camping.

Refining:

There were only slight adjustments to be made for the final design. I added texture, adjusted some placement and tweaked some design elements.

And here it is:

The final product turned out really lovely on the can. I printed on textured paper to give it a handmade feel. The only problem is I probably need to go back and spray fix the design because after a few days of being in my bag, the can design started to rub off.

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That’s it for the Port-A-Poop, catch you later!

Erin

Port-A-Poop: the Process, the Journey

A Little Inspiration

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In my last post I linked to an article that featured breakfasts from around the world. One of them featured a dutch girl having bread with sprinkles on for breakfast. Apparently this is a Dutch staple, which made me go on to read this article about why the Dutch children are so much happier than everyone else, according to a Unicef survey. Read the rest of the reasons for their wellbeing here.

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I’ve always wanted to know what it was like to work as Disney. I read a book once in middle school (“Dream Factory” by Brad Barkley if I can remember correctly) about a group of teens who take jobs as Disney characters during a worker strike. It talked about the “secret tunnels” under Disney, as well as other weird secrets of working at the most magical place on Earth. Here’s a more realistic look at what it’s like to work for the Mouse. The tunnel’s are real, though. 

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I was notorious for doodling on my desks in high school. My french teacher would always take a picture of my masterpieces each class before making me wash down the desk myself. But nothing I made back then could compare to these drawings by Humberto Casas Junca that mixes black letter hand lettering and violent Colombian events. Take a look at his work here. 

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Here’s a playlist about self acceptance that features some of my favourite musical artists, including Brand New, Julian Casablancas, the Smiths, and Deerhunter. Listen and love who you are.

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And finally, a recipe for a “Mexican Burger”, which includes a beef and bean patty, guacamole, salsa, and yummy sides. Learn how to make it from this video. 

Catch you again next week!

Erin

 

A Little Inspiration

The Creative Process

Tasked with illustrating the creative process on a Wednesday night, all I could think about is pizza. But if you consider it, ordering a pizza for a group is a lot like the creative process.

You have to define the type of pizza you want. Is it worth paying the extra few bucks for a large? Probably. You have to discover all you options. There’s a dozen topping choices and I want them all, but what does everyone else want? You have to design the pizza. Luckily, these days we can specify what we want on a pizza online by clicking the options, instead of having to describe over the phone exactly what portion of the pizza will be covered with olives and to go easy on the sauce, please. Then of course someone will chime in that you’re ordering it WRONG, so you’ll have to refine the order to make everyone happy. And finally, it’s delivered, and you get hot pizza and happy friends.

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The Creative Process